Tag Archives: repeal

H.R.1227 – Ending Federal Marijuana Prohibition Act of 2017


 

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PLEASE CONTACT YOUR REPRESENTATIVES TODAY AND SUPPORT THIS BILL TO REMOVE CANNABIS/MARIJUANA FROM THE CONTROLLED SUBSTANCE ACT!

THIS IS THE CLOSEST THING TO A “REPEAL” BILL THAT HAS BEEN OFFERED AND IT IS BEING SUPPORTED BY MOST ACTIVISTS!

 

Find your legislator HERE!

 

To write or call the White House, click here

 

AND FINALLY, WE USE TWITTER!

The White House 

@WhiteHouse

 

President Trump

@POTUS

 

 

February 27, 2017

Mr. Garrett (for himself, Ms. Gabbard, and Mr. Taylor) introduced the following bill; which was referred to the Committee on Energy and Commerce, and in addition to the Committee on the Judiciary, for a period to be subsequently determined by the Speaker, in each case for consideration of such provisions as fall within the jurisdiction of the committee concerned


A BILL

To limit the application of Federal laws to the distribution and consumption of marihuana, and for other purposes.

Be it enacted by the Senate and House of Representatives of the United States of America in Congress assembled,

SECTION 1. Short title.

This Act may be cited as the “Ending Federal Marijuana Prohibition Act of 2017”.

SEC. 2. Application of the Controlled Substances Act to marihuana.

(a) In general.—Part A of the Controlled Substances Act (21 U.S.C. 801 et seq.) is amended by adding at the end the following:

“SEC. 103. Application of this Act to marihuana.

“(a) Prohibition on certain shipping or transportation.—This Act shall not apply to marihuana, except that it shall be unlawful only to ship or transport, in any manner or by any means whatsoever, marihuana, from one State, territory, or district of the United States, or place noncontiguous to but subject to the jurisdiction thereof, into any other State, territory, or district of the United States, or place noncontiguous to but subject to the jurisdiction thereof, or from any foreign country into any State, territory, or district of the United States, or place noncontiguous to but subject to the jurisdiction thereof, when such marihuana is intended, by any person interested therein, to be received, possessed, sold, or in any manner used, either in the original package or otherwise, in violation of any law of such State, territory, or district of the United States, or place noncontiguous to but subject to the jurisdiction thereof.

“(b) Penalty.—Whoever knowingly violates subsection (a) shall be fined under title 18, United States Code, imprisoned not more than 1 year, or both.”.

(b) Table of contents.—The table of contents for the Comprehensive Drug Abuse Prevention and Control Act of 1970 (Public Law 91–513; 84 Stat. 1236) is amended by striking the item relating to section 103 and inserting the following:

“Sec. 103. Application of this Act to marihuana.”.

SEC. 3. Deregulation of marihuana.

(a) Removed from schedule of controlled substances.—Subsection (c) of Schedule I of section 202(c) of the Controlled Substances Act (21 U.S.C. 812(c)) is amended—

(1) by striking “marihuana”; and

(2) by striking “tetrahydrocannabinols”.

(b) Removal of prohibition on import and export.—Section 1010(b) of the Controlled Substances Import and Export Act (21 U.S.C. 960) is amended—

(1) in paragraph (1)—

(A) in subparagraph (F), by inserting “or” after the semicolon;

(B) by striking subparagraph (G); and

(C) by redesignating subparagraph (H) as subparagraph (G);

(2) in paragraph (2)—

(A) in subparagraph (F), by inserting “or” after the semicolon;

(B) by striking subparagraph (G); and

(C) by redesignating subparagraph (H) as subparagraph (G);

(3) in paragraph (3), by striking “paragraphs (1), (2), and (4)” and inserting “paragraphs (1) and (2)”;

(4) by striking paragraph (4); and

(5) by redesignating paragraphs (5), (6), and (7) as paragraphs (4), (5), and (6), respectively.

SEC. 4. Conforming amendments to Controlled Substances Act.

The Controlled Substances Act (21 U.S.C. 801 et seq.) is amended—

(1) in section 102(44) (21 U.S.C. 802(44)), by striking “marihuana,”;

(2) in section 401(b) (21 U.S.C. 841(b))—

(A) in paragraph (1)—

(i) in subparagraph (A)—

(I) in clause (vi), by inserting “or” after the semicolon;

(II) by striking (vii); and

(III) by redesignating clause (viii) as clause (vii);

(ii) in subparagraph (B)—

(I) by striking clause (vii); and

(II) by redesignating clause (viii) as clause (vii);

(iii) in subparagraph (C), by striking “subparagraphs (A), (B), and (D)” and inserting “subparagraphs (A) and (B)”;

(iv) by striking subparagraph (D);

(v) by redesignating subparagraph (E) as subparagraph (D); and

(vi) in subparagraph (D)(i), as redesignated, by striking “subparagraphs (C) and (D)” and inserting “subparagraph (C)”;

(B) by striking paragraph (4); and

(C) by redesignating paragraphs (5), (6), and (7) as paragraphs (4), (5), and (6), respectively;

(3) in section 402(c)(2)(B) (21 U.S.C. 842(c)(2)(B)), by striking “, marihuana,”;

(4) in section 403(d)(1) (21 U.S.C. 843(d)(1)), by striking “, marihuana,”;

(5) in section 418(a) (21 U.S.C. 859(a)), by striking the last sentence;

(6) in section 419(a) (21 U.S.C. 860(a)), by striking the last sentence;

(7) in section 422(d) (21 U.S.C. 863(d))—

(A) in the matter preceding paragraph (1), by striking “marijuana,”; and

(B) in paragraph (5), by striking “, such as a marihuana cigarette,”; and

(8) in section 516(d) (21 U.S.C. 886(d)), by striking “section 401(b)(6)” each place the term appears and inserting “section 401(b)(5)”.


All Actions H.R.1227 — 115th Congress (2017-2018)

 

03/16/2017
Referred to the Subcommittee on Crime, Terrorism, Homeland Security, and Investigations.
Action By: House Judiciary

03/03/2017
Referred to the Subcommittee on Health.
Action By: House Energy and Commerce

02/27/2017
Referred to House Judiciary
Action By: House of Representatives

02/27/2017
Referred to House Energy and Commerce
Action By: House of Representatives

02/27/2017
Referred to the Committee on Energy and Commerce, and in addition to the Committee on the Judiciary, for a period to be subsequently determined by the Speaker, in each case for consideration of such provisions as fall within the jurisdiction of the committee concerned.
Action By: House of Representatives

02/27/2017
Introduced in House
Action By: House of Representatives


https://www.whitehouse.gov/contact

https://www.whitehouse.gov/contact/write-or-call

https://www.congress.gov/bill/115th-congress/house-bill/1227/all-actions

https://www.congress.gov/115/bills/hr1227/BILLS-115hr1227ih.pdf

https://www.congress.gov/115/bills/hr1227/BILLS-115hr1227ih.xml

Additional LINKS of Information:

http://www.constitutionalcannabis.com/kentucky-house–senate-action-alerts.html

https://www.facebook.com/Kentucky-House-Senate-Action-Alerts-133526500152199/

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“Let’s just say the black market has nothing to worry about in Illinois.”


A Profile In Courage: Illinois Cannabis Pioneer Is Left Out In The Cold

Posted by Johnny Green at 9:00 AM on March 6, 2016 Marijuana Business News, Medical Marijuana Policy

aBy Helen Holzer, MMAA Editor

“I’ve had more doors slammed in my face by legislators. It’s been an absolute nightmare,” stated Mike Graham, an early proponent of medical marijuana, who’s been fighting the fight for legalization in Illinois for nearly 15 years.

A resident of Kankakee County, south of Chicago, Graham has degenerative disc disease in his spine. “I spent three years in a hospital bed on Oxycontin, not knowing my name. A hospice nurse said I had to get off the 14 different pills I was taking and needed to take some pot. I was down to 130 pounds and couldn’t keep food down. At 6-foot 4-inches, I was pretty skinny. I’m up to 250 now. I’ve been opioid free now for five to six years.”

Graham said after all the hard work toward legalization, “We didn’t get the bill passed that we wanted. This was not the intent of what we started to do 14 to 15 years ago.”

After the state eliminated chronic pain and nausea from the qualifying list, greatly limiting the number of patients who would qualify for medical marijuana cards, Graham explained, “My background’s in business. I did the numbers, and based on the numbers you had to have 10,000 patients the first year. You need 200 patients per dispensary to make a profit. No one planned on making money during the pilot program. They planned on getting it extended. If the project ends in April 2018, they will all lose money. Nineteen new qualifying conditions that were proposed were all rejected.”

There were 259 licensing applicants for the four-year medical cannabis pilot program in Illinois. He was one of them.

“I applied for both a dispensary and a cultivation center. I spent 11 years putting the program together. I copied off the best and did it the way it should be done. I wasn’t in it for the money. Most people who got licenses were from out of state. It was supposed to be a hometown type of thing. That’s why we applied. We wanted people to depend on us and we’d do it right.”

He continued, “We put together advocates, local businessmen with great reputations. We put together a program with every idiosyncrasy the law provided for. What we didn’t do was make promises that we couldn’t keep. All of the awardees made promises they couldn’t keep. If a local municipality demands that, it’s extortion, it needs to be set up on the merits. If you Google it, you’ll find folks who didn’t follow any rules. This program was supposed to be up and running in 180 days, and right now only a third of the dispensaries are open and only a third of the cultivation centers are operational.”

Applicants were required to post $2 million performance bonds to insure the projects would be rolled out in the 180 days that began on Feb. 2, 2015. As of March 1, 2016, 381 days will have passed. “Those not up and running should lose both bonds, and licenses should be re-issued. The clock is ticking,” he stated.

According to Graham, “During the application process you were supposed to have your background checks done. Instead, this was done after they were awarded. Two awardees were felons.” As for the licensing, “There are so many that were politically awarded. It’s embarrassing, even for Illinois. Two sitting judges, relatives of politicians, those in the hierarchy are involved, the governor’s former chief of staff and former counsel. Five years ago these people wouldn’t even speak to us about medical cannabis.”

There was also a lot of money involved.

CONTINUE READING…

The New Peaceful Pot Head Revolution: Or, Why I’m Going To Infiltrate The Democrats & Run As One Of Them


Cris Ericson

 

 

By CrisEricson2016 | Fri, February 26 2016

S.241 Vermont marijuana Bill does NOT make marijuana legal like alcoholic beverages: (1) because you can brew your own alcoholic beverage at home in Vermont, and this bill does NOT allow you to plant a seed in the ground and grow your own marijuana at home; (2) because the state government does not raid your home and count your cans of beer, but in the new Bill, S. 241, the state will raid your home and count every single seed you have, or have planted, and send you to prison if you are not one of the chosen few to pay a high price for and receive a license to commercially grow and sell marijuana.
S.241 was written for the express purpose of making the rich even richer, and sending the poor to prison for the benefit of the private-for-profit prison industry.

PUBLIC NOTICE to DEMOCRATIC PARTY in VERMONT

I live in the area of Windsor County just north of Windham County, and there are a lot of low income people who will be devastated by S. 241 proposed marijuana bill because when marijuana is legal, they will be tempted, but they can NOT afford to pay for it.

Until marijuana is legal to grow your own at home for your own personal use, without the government prying on your private property to count your plants, I will continue to campaign for legalization.
Because the Democratic Party has taken over the issue of marijuana legalization, whereas I started it in 2002, the first time I was on the ballot for Governor, I will run in the Democratic Primary this election season to off-set the injustice being brought down on low income Vermonters.

The whole current marijuana bill is intended to make a few farmers and Lounge merchants vastly wealthy, while the tax dollars will be spent hounding and stalking poor people and threatening them if they so much as plant one seed.

Did you know this is how the American Revolution began?

The King decided that one company could sell Tea, he made one company a monopoly.
So, the Settlers dressed up as Indians and dumped the Tea into Boston Harbor.
If Peter Shumlin gets his way and does the equivalent of allowing monopolies, allowing only a few businesses to farm marijuana and sell marijuana, then you are inciting a riot, you may be inciting the next Boston Tea Party, only it might be tons of marijuana dumped into Lake Champlain off the Ferry.

If I lose the Democratic Primary, I will be on the ballot for the General Election for the Marijuana Party, of course.

This is a battle of the rich against the poor, and the Democratic Party is in conspiracy with Governor Peter Shumlin to extort money from people for marijuana, rather than allowing them to plant a seed in the ground and grow their own.

Also, of course, your conspiracy with Peter Shumlin includes violating federal marijuana laws; and I might start a group to file an action directly with the Supreme Court of the United States which is allowed when a State law violates the U.S. Constitution – and I think we might have a clear violation of the U.S. Constitution guarantee of equal rights under the law: how can you possibly think it is alright for one man to profit growing marijuana, while another man may be imprisoned for the same thing?

And, in keeping with the Spirit of the American Revolution, you must know you are violating the U.S. Constitution in conspiracy with Peter Shumlin for making laws that require someone else, other than an elected official, to make rules and regulations to use the tax dollars collected;  that is clearly taxation without representation.

Cris Ericson

http://democracy.com/vermont
SOURCE LINK:  http://ibrattleboro.com/sections/politics/new-peaceful-pot-head-revolution-or-why-im-going-infiltrate-democrats-run-one-them
SB 241 VT LINK:  http://legislature.vermont.gov/bill/status/2016/S.241

Remove Marijuana from the Controlled Substances Act & End Cannabis Prohibition


marijuana-pixabay8_large

Petition by Deschedule 2016

To be delivered to The United States House of Representatives, The United States Senate, and President Barack Obama

Issue an Executive Order directing the Department of Justice and the Drug Enforcement Agency (DEA) to cease enforcing codes under the Controlled Substances Act relating to marijuana and its cannabinoids.
Pass legislation to:
• Amend the Controlled Substances Act to remove marijuana and its cannabinoids from the schedule of controlled substances;
• Remove restrictions for import and export of marijuana, including viable seed;
• Transfer authority for cannabis regulation and licensing to the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA), designating it as an agricultural crop;
• Amend Section 7606 of the Agricultural Act of 2014 to remove the “for research purposes only” provision to permit for legal personal and commercial hemp cultivation nationwide.
Join Canada, Mexico and other countries to call for the end of global marijuana prohibition during the United Nation’s General Assembly Special Session on the World Drug Problem, April 19-21, 2016 in New York.

CONTINUE READING…..

SIGN PETITITION HERE…

Update: 16 RS; BR 161, has become SB 13, "Kentucky Cannabis Freedom Act"


 

SB13 Ky Cannabis Freedom Act

SB13/CI/LM (BR161) – P. Clark
     AN ACT relating to the regulation of cannabis and making an appropriation therefor.
     Establish KRS Chapter 245 to regulate the cultivation, testing, processing, taxing, and sale of marijuana to persons aged twenty-one years and older; amend various sections to conform; repeal KRS 218A.1421, KRS 218A.1422, and KRS 218A.1423.

     Jan 06, 2016 – introduced in Senate
     Jan 07, 2016 – to Licensing, Occupations, & Administrative Regulations (S)

PLEASE CONTINUE TO CALL, FAX, MAIL, EMAIL AND VISIT YOUR REPRESENTATIVES AND URGE THEM TO SUPPORT SEN. PERRY B. CLARK’s "CANNABIS FREEDOM ACT" ! 

THIS IS THE ONLY WAY TO MORALLY REPEAL CANNABIS PROHIBITION AND RETURN THIS PLANT TO IT’s PEOPLE!

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Hemp Freedom Act Kentucky


In 2013, SB50 became law, which authorized industrial hemp farming and production provided that Federal law authorized the same. As is being introduced in other states, a simple amendment to that legislation to remove such federal approval – will authorize hemp farming and production on a state level!

The Hemp Freedom Act would authorize farming, production and commerce of industrial hemp in the state, effectively nullifying the federal prohibition on the same. Your action is needed to move this legislation forward.

ACTION STEPS

1. Get the model legislation.

Download HERE

2. Contact your state representative. Strongly, but respectfully urge him or her to introduce and support this bill for your state.

Contact info here: http://openstates.org/find_your_legislator/

3. Contact your state senator. Strongly, but respectfully urge him or her to introduce and support this bill for your state.

Contact info here: http://openstates.org/find_your_legislator/

NOTE – If you have a rep and/or a senator that is hostile to the idea, contact a friendly legislator in a neighboring district and urge their action.

“I live in District ___, and my (REP/SENATOR) will not take action to support Industrial Hemp Farming. Can you help?”

4. Spread the word. Share this information widely by social media, email and more.

 

CONTINUE READING…

Kentucky Cannabis Hemp Health Initiative


Kentucky Cannabis Hemp Health Initiative 2013-2014-2015

 

 

 

 

Framework taken from the Jack Herer Initiative aka CCHI1013. An initiative I had the honor of having a personal hand helping to word, redefining the cannabis/marijuana/hemp movement through selective wording. While attempting to protect and free the plant, the farmers, the prisoners, and the people from validating and mandating over regulation and enslavement through the legal lies = legalize = "common words used"  commonly leading us to Corporate G.M.O.’s = {genetic mutated organisms} which "equal genetically modified crops", seed ownership through patent, small farmers being sued or enslaved,… While they continue to build their Military Industrial Complex with our tax dollars, lives…  So it seems only appropriate I use it as a base to follow and put it forth here within the Commonwealth of Kentucky.

THIS IS A DRAFT, PLEASE DO MAKE ANY SUGGESTIONS FOR ANY PROTECTIONS YOU FEEL HAVE BEEN OVER LOOKED AND ARE NEEDED HERE > https://www.facebook.com/notes/kentucky-cannaibis-hemp-health-initiative-2014/kentucky-cannabis-hemp-health-initiative-2014/284385848356111

AN ACT TO AMEND THE HEALTH AND SAFETY CODE OF THE COMMONWEALTH OF KENTUCKY:

 

I. Add Section ________ to the Health and Safety Code of the Commonwealth of Kentucky, to amend, nullify, restore through repeal of any and all unconstitutional laws or policies to the contrary, including those on the Federal and U.N. Levels, notwithstanding,:

1. No person, individual, or corporate entity shall be arrested or prosecuted, be denied any right or privilege, nor be subject to any criminal or civil penalties for the possession, cultivation, transportation, distribution, or consumption of cannabis hemp marijuana, including:

 
         (a) Cannabis hemp industrial products.
         (b) Cannabis hemp medicinal preparations.
         (c) Cannabis hemp nutritional products.
         (d) Cannabis hemp religious and spiritual products.
         (e) Cannabis hemp recreational and euphoric use and products.

   2. Definition of terms:

    (a) The terms “cannabis hemp” and “cannabis hemp marijuana” mean the natural, non-genetically modified plant hemp, cannabis, marihuana, marijuana, cannabis sativa L, cannabis Americana, cannabis chinensis, cannabis indica, cannabis ruderalis, cannabis sativa, or any variety of cannabis, including any derivative, concentrate, extract, flower, leaf, particle, preparation, resin, root, salt, seed, stalk, stem, or any product thereof.

    (b) The term “cannabis hemp industrial products” means all products made from cannabis hemp that are not designed or intended for human consumption, including, but not limited to: clothing, building materials, paper, fiber, fuel, lubricants, plastics, paint, seed for cultivation, animal feed, veterinary medicine, oil, or any other product that is not designed for internal human consumption; as well as cannabis hemp plants used for crop rotation, erosion control, pest control, weed control, or any other horticultural or environmental purposes, for example, the reversal of the Greenhouse Effect and toxic soil reclamation.

    (c) The term “cannabis hemp medicinal preparations” means all products made from cannabis hemp that are designed, intended, or used for human consumption for the treatment of any human disease or condition, for pain relief, or for any healing purpose, including but not limited to the treatment or relief of: Alzheimer’s and pre-Alzheimer’s disease, stroke, arthritis, asthma, cramps, epilepsy, glaucoma, migraine, multiple sclerosis, nausea, premenstrual syndrome, side effects of cancer chemotherapy, fibromyalgia, sickle cell anemia, spasticity, spinal injury, stress, easement of post-traumatic stress disorder, Tourette syndrome, attention deficit disorder, immunodeficiency, wasting syndrome from AIDS or anorexia; use as an antibiotic, antibacterial, anti-viral, or anti-emetic; as a healing agent, or as an adjunct to any medical or herbal treatment. Mental conditions not limited to bipolar, depression, attention deficit disorder, or attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, shall be conditions considered for medical use.
     

   (d) The term “cannabis hemp nutritional products” means cannabis hemp for consumption by humans and animals as food, including but not limited to: seed, seed protein, seed oil, essential fatty acids, seed cake, dietary fiber, or any preparation or extract thereof. Not Taxable
      

  (e) The term “cannabis hemp euphoric products” means cannabis hemp intended for personal recreational or religious use, other than cannabis hemp industrial products, cannabis hemp medicinal preparations, or cannabis hemp nutritional products.
   

(f) The term “personal use” means the internal consumption of cannabis hemp by people 18 years of age or older for any relaxational, meditative, religious, spiritual, recreational, or other purpose other than sale.
       

(g) The term “commercial production” means the production of cannabis hemp products for sale or profit under the conditions of these provisions.
     

  (h) The term "non-genetically modified " is used to define or establish the Prohibition of any and all Unnatural "genetically modified organism (GMO)" is used to refer to any microorganism, plant, or animal in which genetic engineering techniques have been used to introduce, remove, or modify specific parts of its genome of any and all cannabis, cannabis sativa L, marijuana, hemp,…. Examples include plants being modified for pest resistance; lab animals being manipulated to exhibit human diseases, such as sickle cell anemia; and even glowing jellyfish genes inserted in a rabbit for an art piece.
Ref: http://www.thefreedictionary.com/Genetically-modified+organism
As Apposed To =  To Clarify that there is a Recognized Difference between G.M.O. and Genetically Engineered
    

  (i) The term "genetic engineering" involves isolating individual DNA fragments, coupling them with other genetic material, and causing the genes to replicate themselves. Introducing this created complex to a host cell causes it to multiply and produce clones that can later be harvested and used for a variety of purposes. Current applications of the technology include medical investigations of gene structure for the control of genetic disease, particularly through antenatal diagnosis. The synthesis of hormones and other proteins (e.g., growth hormone and insulin), which are otherwise obtainable only in their natural state, is also of interest to scientists. Applications for genetic engineering include disease control, hormone and protein synthesis, and animal research.
Ref: http://legal-dictionary.thefreedictionary.com/Genetically-modified

3. Industrial cannabis hemp farmers, manufacturers, processors, and distributors shall not be subject to any special zoning requirement, licensing fee, tax that is excessive, discriminatory, double taxation or prohibitive.

4. Cannabis hemp medicinal preparations are hereby restored to the list of available medicines in the Commonwealth of Kentucky. Licensed physicians shall not be penalized for, nor restricted from, prescribing or recommending cannabis hemp for medical purposes to any patient, regardless of age. No tax shall be applied to prescribed cannabis hemp medicinal preparations. Medical research shall be encouraged. No recommending physician shall be subject to any professional licensing review or hearing as a result of recommending or approving medical use of cannabis hemp marijuana. Cannabis hemp nutritious foods are medicine and therefore are subject to current Commonwealth Food & Drug Tax Code Exemptions

5. Personal use of cannabis hemp euphoric products.
      

  (a) No permit, license, or tax shall be required for the non-commercial cultivation, transportation, distribution, or consumption of cannabis hemp.
 

(b) No unconstitutional Testing for inactive and/or inert residual cannabis metabolites shall not be allowed for employment or insurance, nor be considered in determining employment, other impairment, or intoxication, or qualifications for benefits, programs or education,…  Including Protections of Families, against Unconstitutional Testing for Cannabis residual,… and/or Cannabis Use shall not/can not be used to take Custody of children from their families, parents or legal guardians.
     

(c) When a person falls within the conditions of these exceptions, the offense laws do not apply and only the exception laws apply.

6. Use of cannabis hemp products for religious or spiritual purposes shall be considered an inalienable right; and shall be protected by the full force of the State and Federal Constitutions.
 

7. Commerce in cannabis hemp euphoric products shall be limited to adults, 18 years of age and older, and shall be regulated in a manner analogous to the Commonwealth of Kentucky’s tobacco industry model. For the purpose of distinguishing personal from commercial production, 99 flowering female plants and 12 pounds of dried, cured cannabis hemp flowers, bud, not leaf, produced per adult, 18 years of age and older, per year shall be considered as being for personal use.
 

8. The manufacture, marketing, distribution, or sales between adults of equipment or accessories designed to assist in the planting, cultivation, harvesting, curing, processing, packaging, storage, analysis, consumption, or transportation of cannabis hemp plants, industrial cannabis hemp products, cannabis hemp medicinal preparations, cannabis hemp nutritional products, cannabis hemp euphoric products, or any cannabis hemp product shall not be prohibited.
 

9. No Commonwealth of Kentucky law enforcement personnel or funds shall be used to assist or aid and abet in the enforcement of Federal cannabis hemp marijuana laws involving acts which are hereby declared unconstitutional, therefore no longer illegal, as they are considered repealed and nullified in the Commonwealth of Kentucky.
 

10. Any person who threatens the enjoyment of these provisions is guilty of a misdemeanor. The maximum penalties and fines of a misdemeanor may be imposed.

II. Nullify, Repeal, delete, and expunge any and all existing statutory laws that conflict with the provisions of this initiative.
  

1. Enactment of this initiative shall include: amnesty, immediate release of custody from prison, jail, parole, and probation, and clearing, expungement, and deletion of all criminal records and/or all social/family service records/cases for all persons currently charged with, or convicted of any non-violent cannabis hemp marijuana offenses included in this initiative which are hereby no longer illegal in the Commonwealth of Kentucky. People who fall within this category that triggered an original sentence are included within this provision.

2. Within 60 days of the passage of this Act, the Commonwealth Attorney General shall develop and distribute a one-page application, providing for the destruction of all cannabis hemp marijuana criminal records in the Commonwealth of Kentucky for any such offense covered by this Act. Such forms shall be distributed to district and city commonwealth attorneys and made available at all police departments in the Commonwealth to persons hereby affected. Upon filing such form with any Superior Court and a payment of a fee of $10.00, the Court shall liberally construe these provisions to benefit the defendant in furtherance of the amnesty and dismissal provision of this section. Upon the Court’s ruling under this provision the arrest record shall be set aside and be destroyed. Such persons may then truthfully state that they have never been arrested or convicted of any cannabis hemp marijuana related offense which is hereby no longer illegal in the Commonwealth of Kentucky. This shall be deemed to be a finding of factual innocence under Kentucky Penal Code Section 218A.010, et seq.
 

3. Law abiding Cannabis Growers and Consumers retain the Right to possess Firearms as granted to them by the 2nd Amendment of the Constitution. For the use of their protection and prosperity which includes hunting.

III. The legislature is authorized upon thorough investigation, to enact legislation using reasonable standards to:
  

1. License concessionary establishments to distribute cannabis hemp euphoric products in a manner analogous to the Commonwealth of Kentucky’s tobacco industry model. Sufficient community outlets shall be licensed to provide reasonable commercial access to persons of legal age, so as to discourage and prevent the misuse of, and illicit traffic in, such products. Any license or permit fee required by the Commonwealth for commercial production, distribution or use shall not exceed $1,000.00 and not more than $500.00 per small farmer or small business.
 

2. Place an excise tax on commercial and corporate sale of cannabis hemp euphoric products, analogous to the Commonwealth’s tobacco industry model, so long as no excise tax or combination of excise taxes shall exceed $10.00 per ounce.
  

3. Regulate the personal use of cannabis hemp euphoric products in enclosed and/or restricted public places.

4. Exempt cannabis marijuana hemp from any and all farming tobacco "Base" laws, regulations, codes, statutes, which "restricted" or "limit" number of licenses,… based on science that "does not apply" to the agricultural cultivation, propagation, growth or farming of cannabis marijuana hemp which has been scientifically proven to reclaim, remove toxins and restore soil, ground water and our ozone.  

IV. Pursuant to the Ninth and Tenth Amendments to the Constitution of the United States, the people of the Commonwealth of Kentucky hereby nullify, repudiate and challenge Federal cannabis hemp marijuana prohibitions that are in conflict with this Act and our Constitutions, both Federal and our Commonwealth’s.

V. Severability: If any provision of this Act, or the application of any such provision to any person or circumstance, shall be held invalid by any court, the remainder of this Act, to the extent it can be given effect, or the application of such provisions to persons or circumstances other than those as to which it is held invalid, shall not be affected thereby, and to this end the provisions of this Act are severable.

VI. Construction: If any rival or conflicting initiative regulating any matter addressed by this act receives the higher affirmative vote, then all non-conflicting parts shall become operative.

VII. Purpose of Act: This Act is an exercise of the police powers of the Commonwealth for the protection of the safety, welfare, health, and peace of the people and the environment of the Commonwealth, to protect the industrial and medicinal uses of cannabis hemp, to eliminate the unlicensed and unlawful cultivation, selling, and dispensing of cannabis hemp; and to encourage temperance in the consumption of cannabis hemp euphoric products. It is hereby declared that the subject matter of this Act involves, in the highest degree, the ecological, economic, social, and moral well-being and safety of the Commonwealth and of all its people. All provisions of this Act shall be liberally construed for the accomplishment of these purposes: to respect human rights, to promote tolerance, to uphold the Constitutions both Federal and the Commonwealth’s and to end cannabis hemp prohibition. To nullify, repeal and challenge the U.N. to end cannabis marijuana hemp prohibition which is half of the worldwide so-called "War on Drugs"created to uphold the interest of Big Chema, Big Pharma, Big Corps and their Synthetic Military Industrial Prison Complex and to uphold the interest of the people and it’s own Universal Declaration of Human Rights for the reasons already stated with-in it.

 

***************
Due to the fact that the Commonwealth of Kentucky doesn’t allow you to simply petition your State Government as in most states. We ask that you Please print or copy, Sign, and forward copies to your local Representative in Congress and our State Senators here with-in the Commonwealth with a note attached reminding them they are paid to represent your interest regardless of whether they agree with them or not. Thank You!
Written in Honor of the Great Spirit, the universe, the planet and good friends, colleagues, mentors, leaders,… Jack Herer, Gatewood Galbraith, and all who have gone before me and those who will come after us.
Sincerely,
Mary Thomas-Spears aka Rev. Mary

 

PLEASE SIGN PETITION BELOW!  REPEAL CANNABIS PROHIBITION NOW!

 

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Renter finds federal aid, marijuana don’t mix


 

 

Elderly resident loses subsidized apartment

By Jim Mimiaga
Cortez Journal

Lea Olivier, 87, is being evicted from federal housing based on a claim she was smoking marijuana. “A compliance officer said they smelled pot coming from my residence,” Olivier says. “I don’t think it was even me. I’ve used it before to ease arthritis pain.”

Lea Olivier, 87, is being evicted from federal housing based on a claim she was smoking marijuana. “A compliance officer said they smelled pot coming from my residence,” Olivier says. “I don’t think it was even me. I’ve used it before to ease arthritis pain.”

DOLORES – Smoking cannabis? Not a good idea while living in federally subsidized housing, even if the drug has been prescribed by a doctor.

Some residents are finding out the hard way that there is a glaring discrepancy between Colorado’s liberal marijuana laws and the federal government’s outright ban on the substance.

Lea Olivier, an 87-year-old low-income resident living in Dolores, is the latest casualty. She has lived there for five years but says she has been ordered to vacate her rent-subsidized apartment on Central Avenue for allegedly violating the illegal-substances policy.

“A compliance officer said they smelled pot coming from my residence,” she says. “I don’t think it was even me. I’ve used it before to ease arthritis pain.”

Olivier, who lives alone, is now faced with finding alternative housing but is concerned she cannot afford it on her fixed Social Security income.

“I’ll live in a tent or my car if I have to,” she said. “I’ve got 10 days to move, but when I get knocked down, I get back up.”

Terri Wheeler, executive director of Housing Authority of Montezuma County, said conflicting laws on marijuana have become a problem for federal housing operations.

She could not discuss Olivier’s file because of confidentiality regulations but explained there is a “zero tolerance” policy for use or possession of drugs considered illegal by the federal government.

“It has become a problem, and is confusing because marijuana is legal in the state,” Wheeler said. “Residents sign an agreement that they know it is not allowed on the property.”

For Olivier, the rule is too onerous and not practical.

“I’m tired of their petty demands,” she said. “Now, I have to use pain pills, which I don’t like to do.”

Olivier worked in the restaurant business all her life in California. She said a concerned friend guided her to marijuana as an alternative to alcohol.

“It helped me recover from that destructive lifestyle,” Olivier said.

She has medical marijuana card prescribed to control pain but wonders why. Since Amendment 64 passed in Colorado, adults are allowed to purchase and possess marijuana.

“Why should I grease a doctor’s palm to have a medical card?” she asks, referring to annual renewal fees.

Wheeler said since Amendment 64 passed, six residents were required to vacate federal housing for violating the ban on marijuana use. The authority oversees 393 low-income apartments with federal subsidies.

“It was an issue before as well, but state legalization has not helped,” she said.

There is an appeal process for residents who are found to be violating drug laws. While regulations are strictly enforced, they are administered with a practical approach based on circumstances.

“We’re not cold about it; warnings have been given for marijuana. For meth, there is no going back,” Wheeler said. “We know there are valid medical uses for marijuana, but we have to comply with HUD regulations, or we lose our subsidies for people who need housing assistance.”

More education is needed regarding legal use of marijuana in Colorado. Besides being banned within federal housing, it is also illegal to use or possess at federally owned or regulated facilities, including airports, national forest lands, national parks and national monuments.

“We’re doing a lot of re-explaining. You cannot grow marijuana, possess it or use it in our housing units even though the state legalized it,” Wheeler said. “Habitual users usually move out because of the rules.”

Olivier said property managers instruct residents to leave the boundaries of the apartment complex if they want to consume marijuana. Annual inspections of apartments are a part of living in subsidized housing. If illegal drugs turn up, leases are not renewed or notices to vacate are issued.

“They told us to go beyond a certain gate or leave in our car and go somewhere else, but we cannot keep anything in our car if it is parked on their property,” Olivier said. “It is ridiculous; I don’t want to live here anymore anyway.”

One jurisdiction’s solution is another one’s problem. Smoking marijuana in public spaces, including in parks or on trails, is also not allowed under Colorado marijuana laws.

jmimiaga@cortezjournal.com

CONTINUE READING…

Tennessee House version of bill up for health subcommittee vote next week


Just days after being featured in a Leaf-Chronicle article, Dravet Syndrome sufferer Lexy Harris was in the ICU at Vanderbilt Children's Hospital following a series of severe seizures.

CLARKSVILLE, TENN. — Her mother, Felicia Harris, calls her, “a new face of the medical marijuana debate,” referring to Lexy Harris, 6, who suffers from intractable epileptic seizures as a result of Dravet Syndrome, currently being treated with other drugs.

The other anti-convulsant drugs the Harris family has tried – including experimental and non-FDA approved Stiripentol, which costs $2,000 a month – have a host of possible side effects, including damage to major organs and developmental delays, that parents of children with severe forms of pediatric epilepsy, along with many doctors, say are nearly as bad long-term as the disorders their children suffer from daily.

Recently, a derivative of marijuana called cannibidiol, or CBD, has shown promise as an alternative for treating seizures with fewer side effects, advocated for by renowned physicians, including Dr. Sanjay Gupta, formerly a steadfast opponent of medical marijuana use. However, though CBD does not cause a euphoric high like THC (tetrahydrocannibinol), the best-known and psycho-active component of marijuana, it is illegal in Tennessee.

Until very recently, Felicia had called Stiripentol her “miracle drug,” since it controlled Lexy’s seizures better than other prescriptions. Following a hellish week, she is no longer so sure. Now she intends to testify on behalf of medical marijuana before legislators next week on Tuesday, before the House health subcommittee votes on whether to allow H.B. 1385 before the full committee for another vote.

Hell week

Just days after a Leaf-Chronicle article about the medical marijuana debate in which Lexy’s situation was profiled, she was diagnosed as needing a wheelchair because her legs have become progressively weaker. Lab results showed that medications that Lexy was taking were harming her liver, requiring another medication to control the side effects. Her lowered metabolism, another side effect, required yet another prescription.

On the heels of that, Lexy experienced what Felicia called her most violent seizures ever. Lexy was rushed to Vanderbilt Children’s Hospital, where a day after being admitted, she was placed in the intensive care unit (ICU).

“She started having more violent seizures,” said Felicia. “She had a six-hour seizure in her sleep, very high fever and a tube in her nose to suction this crud from her lungs.”

Lexy was put on a feeding tube through her nose, and her medications were increased. Then she caught a common cold.

“The seizures multiplied,” Felicia said. “She aspirated on her own saliva, which brought on pneumonia and her lungs shut down. They had her on 20 liters of oxygen, the most ever, and her stats were still dropping.”

Lexy had previously been in intensive care due to her seizures and hospitalized repeatedly, but never longer than four days, said Felicia. As of Tuesday, Lexy had been in the ICU for seven days, eight days total at Vanderbilt.

On Tuesday, she woke up and began to seem better. Felicia is hopeful of being able to take her home by Thursday or Friday, but she is more afraid to take her home than at any previous time. And though CBD, which comes in an oil form and is not smoked, remains unproven through clinical testing, Felicia intends to fight for it in Tennessee, while contemplating a move to Colorado, as other Tennessee families of children with pediatric epilepsy have already done. She says she has had enough.

‘Enough is enough’

Penn Mattison, Tennessee father of a 2-year-old girl with an intractable pediatric epileptic condition, hit the wall along with his wife, Nicole, several months ago. The Mattisons are among several families that have already made the move to Colorado, where a high CBD-low THC strain of marijuana known as “Charlotte’s Web” is available.

Mattison was in Nashville on Wednesday, testifying before legislators once again, though he no longer lives in the state and is currently unemployed, as is his wife. He flew back using donations. He says he returns because of families like the Harrises who, being a military family, don’t have the ability to leave the state.

“Our hearts go out to the Harrises,” Mattison said in a phone interview on Wednesday after testifying before the full House committee on health. “It’s a tough situation, as my wife and I know only too well.”

The Mattison’s daughter, Millie, was diagnosed with infantile spasms at 3-months-old.

“She was having 300 seizures a day,” said Penn. “As she got older, she began having myoclonic (cluster) seizures along with the infantile spasms. We sought treatment at Vanderbilt, then Cincinnati Children’s Hospital, with some of the top specialists in pediatrics, genetics and neurology in the country.

“Name the treatment, we tried it. Nothing seemed to help. Last summer, Millie nearly died. Her kidneys shut down from the diet they had her on. After her last EEG (electroencephalogram, used to measure brain activity), the doctors wanted to up her pharmaceuticals, and we said, ‘Enough is enough.’

“We heard about the medical marijuana in Colorado, talked to the families using it there and we thought it was just time. Millie was not getting any better, and we had nothing to lose. In a matter of three weeks, we sold our business and we were gone.”

‘Whole-plant’ vs. CBD-only controversy

While Felicia Harris is considering asking Tennessee legislators to support CBD-only legislation to fast-track help for her daughter, like others have done in various states with pending medical marijuana legislation, Mattison rejects the idea.

“What we’re finding in pediatric epilepsy is that THC is needed in some cases more than previously thought,” Mattison said.

“That’s why I’m looking at states like Florida, Georgia, Alabama and Kentucky that are introducing CBD-only legislation where the CBD oil can only have three-tenths of one percent THC in it, and the fact is, that’s only going to help two percent of the patients they’re trying to help, and probably only a quarter of one percent of the total population that can be helped with medical cannabis.

“I think ‘whole-plant’ legislation is what is needed. I do realize that certain patients can be helped right away with a CBD-only bill, but it’s not fair to leave all the other patients out. I firmly believe that.”

Prognosis: Not good

Neither Mattison nor his friend, Doak Patton of the Tennessee chapter of NORML (National Organization for the Reform of Marijuana Laws) has much hope that H.B. 1385, the Koozman-Kuhn Medical Cannabis Act, is going anywhere in 2014.

H.B. 1385 original sponsor Rep. Sherry Jones (D-Nashville) agrees the measure is a long way from passage, though she has some hope that it will emerge from the health subcommittee next week for a later vote of the full committee. But she said that a wholly negative image of marijuana is stuck in the heads of many of her fellow legislators in the House and Senate.

“They still think a 2 year-old is going to be smoking a joint,” she said in a phone interview late Wednesday evening.

She said that she is going to try to talk to three of the Republicans on the health subcommittee (the committee members are five Republican, three Democrat with a Republican chair) to see where they stand on the bill before they leave Nashville on Thursday evening.

“Right now,” said Jones, “I have three Democrats who are all for it and one Republican – but I can’t say his name – who could be number four. But he doesn’t want to be four, he would rather be number five. So I have to convince one of these other Republicans to help us get this out of the subcommittee.

“Then it goes to the full committe, and then it gets worse. They don’t understand. They don’t have a good reason. They want to talk about ‘dosing’ and kids smoking, but it’s not about any of that…”

‘Maybe next year’

Ten patients with various conditions ranging from epilepsy to cancer and traumatic brain injury/post-traumatic stress suffered in combat testified on Wednesday before the full committee. Next week’s presentation will be smaller prior to the subcommittee vote.

Jones said there were few questions asked, and that health subcommittee chair Barrett Rich (R-Somerville), who she said was definitely opposed, did not ask a single question.

“It was so sad to sit there and listen to all those people testify,” Jones said, “and know that there were legislators sitting there thinking they’re a bunch of terrible people because they want to use medical marijuana.”

Repeated attempts by The Leaf-Chronicle to contact Rich regarding H.B. 1385 went unanswered.

Said Jones, “I’m hopeful for the subcommittee anyway, but after that, we’ll see.

“If the Republicans would just poll their constituents, they would find at least 60 percent support this (the medical marijuana bill). But I expect them to maybe come back next year when one of them will sponsor it and maybe pass it then.”

A bill to legalize CBD oil passed out of a Kentucky State Senate subcommittee last week.

Philip Grey, 245-0719
Military affairs reporter
philipgrey@theleafchronicle.com
Twitter: @PhilipGrey_Leaf

CONTINUE READING HERE….

 

***

HERE ARE A FEW LINKS ON KENTUCKY’S CURRENT MEDICAL MARIJUANA BILLS!

 

February 27, 2014
3:10 p.m.

Medical marijuana bill passes House committee

A bill that would allow the use of medical marijuana by Kentuckians with certain medical conditions has cleared the House Health and Welfare Committee on a 9-5 vote.

If House Bill 350 becomes law, the use, distribution, and cultivation of medical marijuana would be permitted under Kentucky law to alleviate the symptoms of patients diagnosed by a medical provider with a debilitating medical condition. A licensing and registration system to allow the use, growth, and distribution of the drug would be established through protocols set out in HB 350, which is sponsored by Rep. Mary Lou Marzian, D-Louisville.

To read more, click here.

 

Cannabis oil bill passes Senate committee

A measure that would legalize limited medical use of cannabis oil was approved by the Senate Health and Welfare Committee today.

Senate Bill 124, sponsored by Committee Chair Julie Denton, R-Louisville, and Sen. Whitney Westerfield, R-Hopkinsville, would allow doctors at the state’s two university research hospitals to prescribe cannabis oil to patients.

Advocates of cannabis oil use say it is effective at treating certain health conditions, including epilepsy.

“This is going to open the door for some first steps on this issue,” Denton said.

SB 124 now goes to the full Senate for further action.

READ MORE HERE…

MORE IN DETAIL INFORMATION HERE…  (use search term:  medical marijuana)

KENTUCKY HOUSE BILL 350 *

KENTUCKY SENATE BILL 124 *

Please input the BILL number in the search on the website link and it will bring it up.

"I don’t want to fucking give this United States government one fucking dollar of taxes…" — Jack Herer, "The Emperor of Hemp", September 12th, 2009


Rev. Mary Spears explains the legalization vs. repeal initiatives and why REPEAL is the only way to proceed.

 

"I don’t want to fucking give this United States
government one fucking dollar of taxes…"
Jack Herer, "The Emperor of Hemp", September 12th, 2009
(Portland Hempstalk Festival–his final speech.)
http://overgrow.ning.com/profiles/blogs/the-fallacy-of-the-legalize-and-tax-cannabis-initiatives

 

By ElectroPig Von Fökkengrüüven in Overgrow The World v2.0

The Fallacy of the "Legalize and Tax Cannabis" initiatives.

Overgrow The World

April 21, 2010

I have listened and understood the words of the late Jack Herer, and I am amazed how few people who say they believe in what Jack was saying truly understand the real reasons why he so horrified at the idea of creating new cannabis taxes. Let me explain quickly: THEY ARE NOT NEEDED AT ALL! As a matter of fact, nothing could be further from the truth!

Now I’m sure that many of you don’t believe me. If that is the case, then you also didn’t understand what Jack meant, or perhaps you simply weren’t paying attention, choosing to hear what you agreed with and ignoring what you didn’t understand, or simply weren’t interested in.

The first "ignored fact" is that the vast majority of the "illicit market" for cannabis is underground, hence, completely untaxed. There is a small fallacy to this statement, however, as even those "underground economies" still purchase their supplies, tools and equipment from "legitimate businesses" and those businesses all pay taxes of one form or another. Cannabis growers order pizza, buy gas, hire electricians and plumbers, et cetera. In this admittedly roundabout way, cannabis already is taxed, albeit to a very small degreee in comparison to the total size of the market as it stands, and to the potential which is known to exist.

Let’s say that cannabis/hemp were re-legalized prohibition was repealed today, and it was done so without the creation of any new tax codes specifically for cannabis. Most think that this would be a bad thing, as it wouldn’t be "exploiting the market" without creating new tax codes, new agencies, new enforcement regimes. Unfortunately, the people who believe that have been lied to, and it’s time that they learned the truth.

In actual fact, if cannabis were re-legalized prohibition was repealed today and taxes weren’t considered in the equation in any way, it would still be beneficial to society in terms of savings alone. We’d save money on policing, of which estimates range that between 40-60% of all police costs are directly due to "drug prohibition." Logic follows that with police not bogged down with grandmothers taking a puff to slow their glaucoma, they would then be able to concentrate their resources on combating real crimes. Things like rape, murder, fraud, home invasion and theft, assault and battery, arson, financial crimes, environmental crimes (of which cannabis/hemp prohibition is one of the leading causes, in fact), and many more REAL crimes with REAL victims.

Taken a step further, lawyers would then be freed up to work on real crimes as well. So would prosecutors. So would judges, court stenographers, prison staff and more. WIthout locking away non-violent "criminals" who have harmed noone else–and this is the scary part for corporations–the "warehousing of otherwise productive humans for profit" would suddenly become far less profitable for the prison-industrial complex to continue, and prohibitionary statute development might begin to fade. With less "legal reasons" to imprison people for essentially minding their own business, more people would not have the lives and futures destroyed.

So let’s say that there were no new taxes created upon re-legalization of cannabis/hemp, and we ONLY consider the tens or hundreds of billions SAVED by no longer wasting time attacking people in their homes for posession or for growing a few plants for their own consumption. Are not those billions of dollars saved a tremendous enough benefit to justify the immediate repeal of cannabis/hemp prohibition? Could saving those billions of dollars not be immediately transferred into lower taxes, or public debt reduction? Would those savings alone not be of tremendous, immediate and long-term social value?

Now let’s consider the tax idea on it’s own merit.

With re-legalization repeal of cannabis/hemp prohibition, there would immediately follow the creation of new businesses to exploit what is widely known to be a global market for cannaibs and hemp products. Each of those businesses would be subject to business income taxes that currently do not exist. WIthout a single character added to business tax statutes, the net result would be the establishment of "new revenue" from those "new businesses."

Of course, those businesses would need people to man storefronts, deliver products, develop products, design packaging, grow the raw materials, process the raw materials, et cetera. These jobs would all be legitimate jobs in the real job market. Each of those jobs would be subject to existing income tax statutes. It’s not hard to see how those "new jobs" would in turn be utilized as "new tax revenue sources" which previously did not exist. Again, without a single line of new codes written, a brand new revenue stream has been obtained.

Each of those new employees and businesses would need supplies, equipment, computers, energy sources, and services. All of those businesses and individuals would then use their incomes to purchase those items or services they needed, either to operate or enhance their businesses, or simply to make their lives at home a little better. All of those products would be purchased at existing retailers and/or wholesalers that exist in the current "legitimate marketplace." All (or the vast majority) of those purchases would be subject to sales taxes at state/provincial and federal levels. Again, not a single comma added to the existing statutes required, but "new revenue" has effectively been attained.

Now let’s take the cannabis market ITSELF.

All of those newly created and legitimate businesses would provide products that people either wanted or needed, be they for medical purposes or for recreational uses. All of those products would then be subject to state/provincial and federal sales taxes. With each sale would then come "new revenues" which do not exist today. Again–are you starting to notice a pattern yet?–without the addition of a single line of code to any existing tax codes.

The Fallacy of "New Government Regulatory Jobs"

People keep being told that "new jobs" will be created in the "new regulatory framework" that "will be needed", but they haven’t thought this through. Some have partly thought it through, thinking that since a percentage of those worker’s incomes will be clawed back by income taxes–say 25%–that means that those jobs are "cheaper" than "real jobs". That’s actually not quite right.

When you look the "real economy", or in other words, the economy from which all government income is derived via the millions of tax codes which exist to take our incomes from us all, any position in this "real economy" is one which is subject to taxation, and therefore, is generally to be considered a contributing position.

On the other hand, when you look at "government jobs" which are wholly funded by "real people" with "real jobs" in the "real economy", every government position which exists–no matter what country or what level of government–is a drain on society, and must be so, as "we hired them to work for us."

Now let’s take a simple example that we’ve all heard a million times: "Joe The Plumber."

If Joe was working in his own shop, or for someone else in their business, he would be a contributing factor in the "real economy" in the amount of taxation on his income, we’ll use 25% for illustration purposes. This means that 25% of his income is diverted to "public employees and projects" needed for society to function as it currently exists.

Now let’s take Joe’s situation if he were a government employee…let’s say he’s employed by the local Public Utilities Comission. Now Joe’s income is wholly funded by tax dollars, and thus, is a drain on society. We’ve established an income tax rate of 25%, so we can now say that Joe is "cheaper" because now his services now only costs us 75% of what they would, had he remained in his private sector job.

Here is the "minor error" in that logic: Joe has moved from the "real economy" to the "government economy". In making that move, the "real economy" has lost 100% of a "real job", while the government has gained an employee "at a discount of only 75% of their private sector wages." When you add that up, you see quite clearly that Joe’s "new job" is effectively now a 175% loss to society as a whole.

Joe’s still making the same amount of money. We’re still paying him the same amount of money when he does his work…but now he is NOT contributing to the "real economy" at all, while he is draining 75% of his wages from unnaportioned taxation of the people who are forced to pay his salary, whether they partake of his services or not.

Unfortunately, this also applies to every "equivalent government position" that exists in the world. Accountants cost 175% of what they would cost in the "real economy." So do welders, secretaries, cafeteria cooks, lawyers…ALL of them! If they work for the government, they are at a much higher cost than their equivalent "real world" positions in the real economy.

We need to keep this in mind whenever we hear talk of " new regulations" because that almost always means "new regulatory bodies", and that DEFINITELY always means "new government employees" which are going to cost us dearly if we allow such things to occur.

If we are forced to accept some form of taxation in order to move closer to the full repeal of cannabis/hemp prohibition, so be it…let’s move a little closer…but the second we have a positive change under our belts, we must NOT become complacent! We must continue to fight for the full repeal of cannabis/hemp prohibition until the batttle is decisively won.

Once we have some "half-assed reasonable legislation" in place, we can guage what are the worst parts of those enacted bills and target them one by one until they’re all gone, and then, we will have our ofn freedom, and freedom for what is arguably the most important plant known on this planet.

At the Hempstalk Festival, during Jack Herer’s final public speech, he said (among other things):

"I don’t want to fucking give this United States government one fucking dollar of taxes…"

Obviously, he understood my thinking…or perhaps, I simply learned enough to come to an understanding of his.

What about you?

EDIT:  I have since come up with the complete solution to the perils of prohibition in THREE WORDS:

1) DESCHEDULE.
2) REPEAL.
3) DONE!!!

If you remember only three words in your lifetime, THOSE are the ones that WILL end cannabis/hemp prohibition.

If we continue to be led by propagandists and prohibitionists into accepting ever-longer-names for prohibition, while believing we are "moving closer to freedom", we’ll never get there…it’ll just keep getting more complex, more costly, and more damaging to society as a whole…as it has for decades already.

If we allow our politicians to "reschedule" cannabis, this COULD mean an outright statutory BAN on ALL cannabis use, medicinal or otherwise, for the length of time it would take "to conduct safety studies."  We already know that if they keep finding proof cannabis is non-toxic, anti-oxidant, neuroprotectant, et cetera, we also already know that these "safety studies" will be completed in an absolute minimum of 4-6 years, to an absolute maximum of…NEVER!

"Decriminalization" is NOT repeal.  It’s still illegal.

"Legalization" simply tells the politicians and courts that we believe the fix to bad legislation conveived of in fraud can only be fixed not by deleting it from the recored entirely, but by making it more complex…but keeping it all on the books for future "quick-n-easy" readoption when prison investors want higher revenues to do their profit-taking from.

"Re-legalization" is just two letters prepended to the above.

"Tax and regulate" tells OUR EMPLOYEES that "we owe them new taxes for not wasting our money attacking us."  If we keep buying into the scam, they’ll get it, too!

"Regulate like [insert commodity of the hour here]" is just another way to justify the creation of a new regulatory body, hire new "government employees", raise taxes, lower rights and freedoms, all while telling the wilfully ignorant population that "they are free."  They ain’t.  They won’t be.

"REPEAL" means:  The statutes are GONE.  Deleted.  History.  Erased.  Terminated.  Removed from the "law" journals.  NEVER TO RETURN.

The ridiculous proposition that "if we want it legal again, we have to create new taxes" is also a prime example of idiotic propaganda foisted upon a wilfully ignorant population.  Only two seconds of thought tells you the truth of the situation…we do NOT need to "appease our employees" when we finally force them to stop wasting our money.  Not wasting all those billions of dollars every year should be, and IS, reward enough to everyone all on it’s own!

When we find out we’ve got a crooked mechanic who’s bee charging us for spark plug changes on every visit that we didn’t really need, and were nothing more than a waste of OUR money…we don’t praise them and give them permanent bonuses, do we?  So where did the idea come from, that in order for our employees to simply do their job with a litle more brainpower behind their actions, that we need to give them more money and hire more people?  Reality has to sink in eventually, folks!  Even through the infinitely thick skulls of "politicians."  They might be as dense as the core of a neutron star, but they still have ear holes!  SO START SPEAKING UP!!!

Either we DEMAND the full repeal of prohibition, or we will continue on with it forever, just with a different name, and higher taxes…and let’s face it, folks:  OUR EMPLOYEES will be completely happy to rename what they’re doing to us and call it whatever we want to call it, if we’re dumb enough to allow it to continue.  Are we really so blind as to STILL not see the truth for what it is?

Want it over?  MAKE it over!

1) DESCHEDULE.
2) REPEAL.
3) DONE!!!

It really is just as simple as that.

* That solves prohibition on a national level…we still need to remove cannabis/hemp from the United Nations Single Convention on Narcotic Drugs in order to end prohibition GLOBALLY.

Views: 3521

Tags: Herer, Jack, PROHIBITION, REPEAL, Rick, Simpson, cannabis, freedom, health, human, More…

 

By ElectroPig Von Fökkengrüüven in Overgrow The World v2.0

The Fallacy of the "Legalize and Tax Cannabis" initiatives.

Overgrow The World

April 21, 2010

 

Jack Herer’s last speech at Portland Hempstalk Festival 2009–HIS FINAL SPEECH BEFORE HE DIED…MAY HE NEVER BE FORGOTTEN!

 

MY PERSONAL COMMENT:  SOMETIMES (MOST OFTEN) OLD NEWS IS THE BEST NEWS – SMK.

Will Obama, Romney Clarify Their Positions on Medical Marijuana in Colorado Election Debate?


 

 

mmj3

 

Tags: marijuana legalization, obama on medical marijuana, presidential debates, romney on medical marijuana

On Wednesday, President Barack Obama and GOP nominee Mitt Romney will face off on live television in the first of several debates that could shape the upcoming election.

Medical marijuana professionals should tune in: The candidates will most certainly field questions about MMJ and cannabis legalization in general, given that the debate will be held in Denver.

Colorado has one of the largest medical marijuana industry’s in the country, home to more than 1,000 dispensaries, grow sites and infused-product manufacturers.  It also has a measure on the ballot this November asking voters to legalize the general use of marijuana.

Additionally, the debate is focused on domestic policy and will be held at a university, so you can bet that medical cannabis will be a particularly big topic.

The biggest question going into the debates, however, is will either candidate actually shed any new light on their vague positions regarding medical marijuana and cannabis legalization?

It’s possible but doubtful. Both Obama and Romney have been asked countless times about MMJ, and in most cases they sidestep the question or offer vague answers. In an interview Monday with the Denver Post, Romney said he opposes “marijuana being used for recreational purposes and I believe the federal law should prohibit the recreational use of marijuana.” But he didn’t directly address medical marijuana, though a campaign spokesman told the Washington Post today that Romney is against MMJ legalization.

Obama has been similarly vague about medical marijuana in recent interviews, and the current MMJ crackdown under his administration is uneven and unpredictable.

Both presidents, however, seem to be against the idea of general marijuana legalization. Romney has made it crystal clear that he would not allow that to happen under his watch. Obama, while less assertive on the issue, has indicated he doesn’t think it’s the proper path for the country to take. It unclear how the presidents would respond if an individual states such as Colorado legalizes cannabis use.

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CONTINUE READING….